Removable Kitchen Backsplash

Removable Kitchen Backsplash

Create a Practical Backsplash With Chalkboard Paint Brooklyn Homemaker Tux from Brooklyn Homemaker has updated his kitchen backsplash a few times with paint. Last year he created a very functional backsplash, where he can jot down notes, using chalkboard paint. This year, he decided to brighten things up by painting his backsplash a soothing shade of mint green. You can check it out here. Continue to 11 of 14 below.
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Removable Kitchen Backsplash

Tux from Brooklyn Homemaker has updated his kitchen backsplash a few times with paint. Last year he created a very functional backsplash, where he can jot down notes, using chalkboard paint. This year, he decided to brighten things up by painting his backsplash a soothing shade of mint green. You can check it out here.
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Removable Kitchen Backsplash

Spice Up Your Kitchen With Decal Tiles Home Art Stickers Just because you can't renovate the kitchen in your rental, doesn't mean you have to live with an unattractive backsplash. These ideas will conceal the ugly without risking your securing deposit. Even better, if you have basic DIY skills, you can install a brand-new backsplash in a single weekend. Continue to 2 of 14 below.
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Removable Kitchen Backsplash

After my post about removable wallpaper for backsplashes, I received a few emails asking that I post more about temporary options like this for renters. In my last apartment, I made a backsplash out of 1/4″ plywood secured with Velcro (it was easy to remove when we moved, and left no residue or damage whatsoever), but I started wondering whether there are temporary tile options, too—so I did some research. And by “research,” I mean I Googled it.
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Removable Kitchen Backsplash

So you love glass tile backsplashes, but your landlord won't let you install one in your rental. This project by Thrifty Crafty Girl will resolve your dilemma. She used a peel and stick product called Smart Tiles to create a fake but realistic looking glass backsplash. Just as swell, the tiles are 100 percent removable.
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Removable Kitchen Backsplash

Peel and Stick Tiles Thrifty Crafty Girl So you love glass tile backsplashes, but your landlord won't let you install one in your rental. This project by Thrifty Crafty Girl will resolve your dilemma. She used a peel and stick product called Smart Tiles to create a fake but realistic looking glass backsplash. Just as swell, the tiles are 100 percent removable. Continue to 8 of 14 below.
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Removable Kitchen Backsplash

DIY Acrylic and Fabric Kitchen Backsplash, Create Paper Template Use a long sheet of paper to create a template for cut outs, such as window sills and electrical outlets. Tape the paper in place and cut around areas to be removed with a craft knife or box cutter. Measure the distance from the one end of your backsplash to the first place to be cut out and transfer the paper template to the acrylic using that measurement as a guide. Outline the template on the acrylic with a permanent marker, score it, and gently snap away the unnecessary pieces. From: Sam Henderson
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Removable Kitchen Backsplash

DIY Acrylic and Fabric Kitchen Backsplash, Adhere Backsplash to Wall Apply a generous bead of clear, silicone, adhesive caulk to the back of the dried fabric. Press the acrylic and fabric in place against the wall. If necessary, use painter’s tape to hold it in place while the caulk sets. From: Sam Henderson
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Tux from Brooklyn Homemaker has updated his kitchen backsplash a few times with paint. Last year he created a very functional backsplash, where he can jot down notes, using chalkboard paint.
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Just because you can't renovate the kitchen in your rental, doesn't mean you have to live with an unattractive backsplash. These ideas will conceal the ugly without risking your securing deposit. Even better, if you have basic DIY skills, you can install a brand-new backsplash in a single weekend.
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If your current backsplash is just a boring blank wall, you can liven it up with faux tiles. This DIY by Nicki, the blogger behind Sweet Parrish Place explains how you can create a classic subway tile backsplash with paint.
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We had to do something to help us enjoy the room while we figured out the long-term plan.  It needed to be relatively affordable, easy, removable, and colorful.
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Having lived in rentals all my adult life, I feel comfortable generalizing that the kitchen is the most generic, bland, devoid of personality room of a rental apartment. And with restrictions on altering the space, they can be the most challenging to decorate and make your own. However, the backsplash is one rental battleground where you can declare victory. Here are fifteen examples that even Charlie Sheen would agree are “winning”.
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DIY Acrylic and Fabric Kitchen Backsplash, Cut Fabric Lay your fabric face up on a flat surface. Lay the acrylic sheet(s) face up on top of the fabric. Make sure the fabric is lined up neatly and patterns are where you want them, and then draw an outline approximately 1 inch bigger than the acrylic sheet all the way around. Use a rotary cutter or scissors to cut out the shape. Do not cut out the holes for electrical outlets or light switches. That will be done later. Be sure to leave fabric intact around cut out areas. From: Sam Henderson
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I rent a townhouse and have the standard beige walls. If I use the Smart Tiles, is there a way to remove them? I want to do a kitchen backsplash. If not, could I stick the tiles to another surface and then place that on the wall? Any suggestions are appreciated!
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Reply Caroline August 17, 2015 at 4:55 pm Excellent! The kitchen in my otherwise beautiful and minimalist 1960s rambler was “updated” by previous owners, and the backsplash is especially horrible. However my husband is hesitant to do any improvements because we might not stay there for very long. This seems like a pretty A+ solution in the meantime. Thanks for this post.
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Reply Kimi November 15, 2016 at 1:25 pm I rent a townhouse and have the standard beige walls. If I use the Smart Tiles, is there a way to remove them? I want to do a kitchen backsplash. If not, could I stick the tiles to another surface and then place that on the wall? Any suggestions are appreciated!
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they look awesome. Sadly, I don't think if they are heat and cold sensitive that they'd work for me. 🙁 We have exterior kitchen walls that have little to no insulation, so in the summer the backplash is warm and in the winter it's super cold. I tried peel and stick vinyl tiles and they lifted. I ended up painting on a “faux tile” backsplash!
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Taking it out turned out to be quite a pain, as it was actually installed under the upper cabinets.  It had to be carefully cut out and then peeled off.  But I was right: having no backsplash at all was better than that color.  Especially with the other changes we made in our renovation, like an open floor plan or new counters in the kitchen.
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5. Anna of Door Sixteen wanted to hide a backsplash made of floor tiles and her solution involved plywood, Velcro, and paint with super stylish results.
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7. Similar to the idea above, Cambria, an editor at our sister site The Kitchn, hung small pieces of artwork (food photos) to the blah backsplash of her last apartment.
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13. Not all renters are barred from painting. If you can, take a look at this lovely painted backsplash. It’s a time consuming project, but only cost $30.
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Use a long sheet of paper to create a template for cut outs, such as window sills and electrical outlets. Tape the paper in place and cut around areas to be removed with a craft knife or box cutter. Measure the distance from the one end of your backsplash to the first place to be cut out and transfer the paper template to the acrylic using that measurement as a guide. Outline the template on the acrylic with a permanent marker, score it, and gently snap away the unnecessary pieces.
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Measure the distance from the one end of your backsplash to the first place to be cut out and transfer the paper template to the acrylic using that measurement as a guide. Outline the template on the acrylic with a permanent marker, score it, and gently snap away the unnecessary pieces. Sand away any rough edges on the acrylic with fine-grit sandpaper.
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Add painter’s tape to the counter and the acrylic leaving about ¼” of space from the tape to the corner. Apply another bead of clear caulk between the two pieces of tape. Dip your finger or thumb in water and smooth out the caulk pressing it into the corner. Peel away the tape to reveal a clean seam. Add a bead of caulk around the outside edge of the acrylic and smooth it out with moistened fingertips. NOTE: If using more than one length of acrylic for a long backsplash, be sure to add a bead of caulk where the two ends butt up against each other, pressing it into the crack and smoothing it out with moistened fingertips. Allow caulk to dry completely before getting it wet again. Replace the face plates, if necessary.