Beadboard Backsplash Kitchen

Beadboard Backsplash Kitchen

Style For Less Add texture and a touch of cottage style by installing a beadboard backsplash. Carefully Measure Use a flat-head screwdriver to remove outlet plates and switch plates that run along the backsplash area. Measure the backsplash area and make a drawing and cut list. Try to work in four-foot sections, this will ensure that the wainscotting will line up easily. Remember to note the exact location of electrical switches and outlets. Cut the Beadboard Use a circular saw to cut the beadboard to size. To make cut-outs for outlets and switches, use a pencil to mark the exact shape of the cut out. Drill holes in two opposing corners with a large (3/8″ or 1/2″) bit. Then drop in the blade of a jig saw into one of the holes then cut out the rest of the opening. Make Sure it Fits Test fit the beadboard before securing it to the wall. Ensure that the cut-outs align properly with outlets. Apply Adhesive Using a caulk gun, apply heavy-duty construction adhesive such as Liquid Nails in a serpentine pattern to the back of the beadboard. Press the beadboard onto the wall. Fasten it to the Wall Use a finish nailer or hammer Brad nails around the perimeter of each section of backsplash. Patch and Finish Fill the nail holes and paint or stain your new backsplash.
beadboard backsplash kitchen 1

Beadboard Backsplash Kitchen

So I thought it was about time I put together the tutorial for the beadboard backsplash I put up in the kitchen. It was a semi-easy and inexpensive way to brighten up the space. Here is a before picture of our kitchen. Well, actually this is an in progress picture. When we first moved in the hardware was yellow and was centered in the middle of the cabinets. We filled in all the holes with wood filler, sanded, primed and painted them. We replaced the hardware with these bronze knobs from Lowe’s. I would like to replace the hardware on the drawers sometime soon with something a little different. But I love the finish of them so that won’t change. We don’t get a ton of natural light in here so it was in desperate need of some brightening up! I had Matt’s dad help me take out the ugly florescent lights from under the cabinets. Then I took a crow bar and got to work ripping out the backsplash. Beautiful sight right? I had to unscrew all those nails from underneath the cabinet and the ones I couldn’t get to I hammered down. Then I scraped off the pieces of wood particle that were left from the backsplash and sanded it smooth. I fixed the places in the wall that had gotten ripped from the backsplash extraction. So once everything had been prepped I measured the space between the counter and the bottom of the cabinet and the length of space that would need the beadboard. I took my measurements to Home Depot and they cut the pieces for me. So much faster than doing it myself! I measured where the outlet holes needed to be and drew them out with a pencil. I piloted holes into each of the corners using my drill. This was my first time doing this. I was just practicing with the hole in the middle. =) I used a jigsaw to cut out the holes. After all the holes were cut out I used liquid nails to attach the beadboard to the wall. I used small white nails to secure it a little more just placing them in a few places around the edges. Matt’s dad raised the outlets a little for me so they would be level with the beadboard. I caulked around all the edges and where I pushed two pieces of beadboard together and then painted everything with a couple coats of bright white. Because my countertops were not flush with the wall I had to use a thick baseboard to cover up the space. Matt’s dad helped me add a small piece of wood to the back to make them thick enough to cover it completely. I didn’t attach the baseboard molding to the wall right away because I wasn’t sure what I was going to do about the counter at that time. I decided to paint my countertops to look like granite. You can check out the details of that in this post. I just finished painting the kitchen walls and will show you as soon as I finish up with a little accessorizing. The other half of the kitchen is almost finished so I’ll post pictures of that also. I’ve got lots of projects I’m working on this summer and will try and post as much as I can! Thanks for reading! I’m linking up with a few of these parities. Check them out!
beadboard backsplash kitchen 2

Beadboard Backsplash Kitchen

  I wanted to share with you guys my lovely new beadboard backsplash. I love it! Let’s just start from the beginning. So, I have wanted a beadboard backsplash for months, but with him being gone for a few months for the military & our busy lives, we finally got around to it on Memorial day weekend. So, thinking it would only take a few hours to put up the beadboard, I was sure it would not consume our whole holiday weekend. I mean how hard could it be? I was wrong. I should have known it was going to be a tedious project when we went to our local Lowe’s to pick up the beadboard & their saw was broken. We drove 45 minutes to the next nearest Lowe’s & purchased our beadboard & trim. So without boring you, let me just say that the project ended up taking 2 days, & about 7 additional trips to Lowe’s. It wasn’t a difficult project per say, but we did run into a few issues that made it take longer then expected. Thankfully my husband and I had a lot of fun working on this together even though there were some bumps along the way. If you are thinking about doing this project ready below for some additional tips & tricks… Lets admire some Before & After photos now….
beadboard backsplash kitchen 3

Beadboard Backsplash Kitchen

Step One // How to Install a Solid-Surface Backsplash Building a Solid-Surface Backsplash Overview Illustration by Gregory Nemec Solid surfacing is a nonporous synthetic material, made to look like stone, that is commonly used for shower and tub surrounds and for countertops. It’s a natural fit for a backsplash because it’s easy to clean. For such an application, however, it’s important to use 1/4-inch-thick material, which is comparable to the thickness of tile. Anything thicker would be hard to cut and would look too bulky once installed. The panel style you choose should complement the design of your kitchen: beadboard for a country kitchen or a pebbled pattern for a rustic look, for example. Avoid options with deep crevices where grease and dirt can settle or a pattern that is difficult to match up at the seam. Cutting the material is slow going; fit your jigsaw with a metal-cutting blade and your circular saw with a diamond blade for the best results. The best way to make an accurately fitted panel—one that accounts for any changes in height or cuts around a window or outlet—is to make a plywood template of the area first, then trace around it onto the solid surface. You don’t need to use a single piece of plywood for this; strips glued together to indicate the outline of the various parts works well and is easy to put together. To create the illusion of a seamless solid surface, minimize joints by installing the backsplash in one piece, if possible. A backsplash should be at least 4 inches high, but it can also fill the entire space between countertop and upper cabinets. Keep in mind, however, that varying the height of the backsplash can be distracting, so if the walls above your counters transition from cabinets to open space, you’ll want to just continue the backsplash beyond the cabinets at the same height, then finish the raw edge with some trim detail. The one exception to the consistent-height rule is the area behind a range, between the countertop and a vent hood, when you would want the backsplash to fill the entire area.
beadboard backsplash kitchen 4

Beadboard Backsplash Kitchen

Solid surfacing is a nonporous synthetic material, made to look like stone, that is commonly used for shower and tub surrounds and for countertops. It’s a natural fit for a backsplash because it’s easy to clean. For such an application, however, it’s important to use 1/4-inch-thick material, which is comparable to the thickness of tile. Anything thicker would be hard to cut and would look too bulky once installed. The panel style you choose should complement the design of your kitchen: beadboard for a country kitchen or a pebbled pattern for a rustic look, for example. Avoid options with deep crevices where grease and dirt can settle or a pattern that is difficult to match up at the seam. Cutting the material is slow going; fit your jigsaw with a metal-cutting blade and your circular saw with a diamond blade for the best results. The best way to make an accurately fitted panel—one that accounts for any changes in height or cuts around a window or outlet—is to make a plywood template of the area first, then trace around it onto the solid surface. You don’t need to use a single piece of plywood for this; strips glued together to indicate the outline of the various parts works well and is easy to put together. To create the illusion of a seamless solid surface, minimize joints by installing the backsplash in one piece, if possible. A backsplash should be at least 4 inches high, but it can also fill the entire space between countertop and upper cabinets. Keep in mind, however, that varying the height of the backsplash can be distracting, so if the walls above your counters transition from cabinets to open space, you’ll want to just continue the backsplash beyond the cabinets at the same height, then finish the raw edge with some trim detail. The one exception to the consistent-height rule is the area behind a range, between the countertop and a vent hood, when you would want the backsplash to fill the entire area.

Beadboard Backsplash Kitchen

Beadboard Backsplash Kitchen
Beadboard Backsplash Kitchen